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to do. my mom was always taught my colleagues be for we came out, used as an expression. she would say chile, you're defined by your courage and you are redeemed by your loyalty. you're defined by your courage and redeemed by your loyalty. in the four years i've serve here, and were i still and the senate serving out that term, i would be senate pro tempore which is the seniormost senator roe, which is a frightening thought to think i'm that old. but i never met a man, or woman, in that period with as much physical and moral courage as daniel inouye. i never met a man with as much loyalty to his country, to his family and to his friends. some who served with him a long time remember he's one of the few people who stand on the floor to defend a colleague who was under siege, without ever considering the political consequences for him back home. he always just did the right thing. he always had the moral courage to do the right thing your hundred and. he had a compass that always directed him, and he was resolved to do truly extraordinary things. things that few women and men ever contem
are actually sold out during the first presentation and >>guest: are kidding me? please >>host: bring us more >>guest: will medellin >>host: miglin is that next i will be back at noon with the kindle fire. cheers! [♪ music ♪] everybody my name is connie craig-carroll with your final visit of the year for marilyn miglin.now coming up we have 15 of marilyn miglin is the finest fragrances. she is a beauty pioneer with over 40 years of experience in the beauty industry. she is a former model and ballerina upper yet she is hands on. . --and that she is hands on. >>guest: thank you to everybody. >>host: we have 15 of your finest fragrances $17 on flex pay. i know we are experiencing a hold right now, you can shop by can visit www.hsn.com. views expressed automated ordering. you have chosen the best of the best fragrances. >>host: >>guest: >>guest: i think our ladies chose those. >>host: best sellers from all of your collections.it looks like a beautiful book. if you are giving the entire collection as a gift. these are wonderful. >>guest: you can do two, four, five, think about the q
>> thank you. thank you to all my house colleagues were with us today. representative don manzullo and leader mcconnell, senator feinstein, john mccain. our thanks and appreciation to mrs. bush and madame secretary for taking time to be here today and the contributions to this effort and your commitment to advancing the cause of freedom and democracy in burma. i would be remiss if i did not mention someone who's not with us today, congressman tom lantos. tom, and his wife and staff, worked so hard on behalf of burma for so many years. i wish he were here to share this moment in history with us because i think today is an amazing day. today is an incredible. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008 when aung san suu kyi was under house arrest that in a few short years she would be standing or sitting with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor as a member of the burmese parliament. back then we thought about granting the metal and extension which may have been the first time a person would have received in the history of the metal the congressiona
to shirley from palm beach florida. surely come thanks for joining us on the "washington journal". >> caller: good morning. i worked in mental health services around 20 years after it raised my family and myself. twenty years of that was then ejected. in the hospitals. i suffer from depression. and i found that i have allergies. there is a book and he talks about how allergies can affect us so severely that it can cause things like depression, retardation, epilepsy and many physical ailments as well. hypertension and hyperglycemia and etc. and it is hard and people look at me like i'm crazy. and i say, look at your diet. many people believe that schizophrenia can be cured by diet? >> host: congressman? >> guest: there are a lot of things that go into this. you people have food reactions and supplements that can affect them? yes. as a cause of schizophrenia, i don't know. i don't want people to think that if only i change my diet, it will go away. there are a lot of other issues there. there are genetic issues, environmental issues, many other aspects here. working with this for 35 years, wor
's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and debbie, jim and debbie have raised four wonderful children. they got great grandkids, and i know jim is looking forward to staying involved in pushing the conservative cause outside the body. he was an effective voice in the senate, whether you agreed with jim or not. he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his positions and did it very effectively. jim made the republican party, quite frankly, look inward and do some self-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and
>> you don't know us investigating reporting. the point we've seen over the years is not just economics. it's was caused administering because it's troublesome. ..'s watch live sunday january 6th at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> coming up booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we interview authors. acclaimed inventor ray kurzweil and his latest book, how to create a mind:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engi
is maria pallante and i am united states registrar of copyrights and director of the u.s. copyright office and i would like to say at the outset that for me this is a very wonderful privilege because as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently gi
and i'll fix that. if there are improvements come a senator that you to suggest, please let us know that the insurance is required and important because the federal government is helping to fill the gap, hope to file quickly ended at the good sometimes insurance proceeds can be slow and frankly some insurance come and is there better than others about honoring the contracts they have with these businesses and that's another important oversight that i hope the committee jurisdictions, which is not this committee, can provide in this recovery. are there any other questions because i'd like to be to the second panel and give them an opportunity. anything else you will want to add quick >> no, ma'am, thank you. >> we been hit with the $60 billion request -- did that come to the white house? >> it did. the white house and appropriations committee has reviewed it. >> were part of that is attributable to her within this committee's jurisdiction. does anybody have an idea? [inaudible] [inaudible] >> -- 40 million for the economic initiatives who discuss and 10 million for the ig. >> how muc
a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepren
that their loved by all of the fans here and anthony is joining us, as a football player with a love to have this on the sidelines. >>guest: with the warm seats we sit be greatee my teammates, at this knuckling on these things very again. >>guest: this is the ultimateift and i do think what is it about this as we did talk about this huge comet that they have fun here, the logo, and the team in here they do have, the advisers on the front and these pfizer's to show a reflection of the landscape and whether it be the stadium, and that is significant because it really does show and it really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the fi
forces in there in the street using politics and the ballot box. the point i was trying to stress, may last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face
, the main thesis is the 300 million gouda recognizers and they're all basically using the same algorithm and is recognizers connect themselves in a hierarchy. the neo cortex can develop these ideas were. that's the essence of it. they basically running the same method in secret of human thought is the ability to build a hierarchy with other recognizers. so at a low level where recognition simple things like the crossfire and a higher level you have thomasa as an apple. it's a much higher level. that was funny, that was ironic. they are the same except for the position in the hierarchy. produce a hierarchy come with? were not with warren -- [inaudible] we are not born with that knowledge of english or chinese. in fact, all of these connections reflect memories, personality. the neo cortex creates from our own experience. so the more important you are what you think. the grandson has laid down several layers. you basically can work on one-liner at a time. >> host: the layers have been sent to some extent by biology come at a geometric information. >> guest: the ability to create the layers
were their sort of elements where we agree and hing,f t that will help us understand g in iraq or afghanistan or other conflicts, think if you want a of the viet nam war it is worth the to work like this that will help triet .. .. this is just under an hour. [applause] shalom, good evening, everybody. it's my pleasure to be with uiq. i'm very happy to see so many people coming here and showing an interest in my boat i would like in the next 20 minutes to show we do not want this in the book, but behind the idea. we can all agree with happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election he
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
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and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
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, and the 1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of th
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
are ubiquitous parts of our communications system. they came about because of the use of unlicensed spectrum. the lot advances the use in several ways of allowing the fcc to use existing white spaces in the broadcasts than for unlicensed use, gives the sec the authority to reorganize the existing white spaces to maximize their value and perhaps most important it allows the fcc to create guard bans in the repurchased broadcast television spectrum that may be used for new unlicensed services like super why 5. this is smart spectrum policies that recognizes the increasingly interdependent nature of licensed and unlicensed operations. the bands will enhance the value of the spectrum to be auctioned by protecting it from interference and create a nationwide ban to prime spectrum that can be used for new innovation in unlicensed use. that is why i am pleased the fcc's proposed rules are faithful to congressional intent to promote innovation in unlicensed use. second, the law preserves the fcc's ability to use auction rules to promote competition in the wireless industry while insuring no single ca
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
to be the best solution for us, the other test is a bio markers tests and that is an indication of the effect of growth hormone on the body and since those effects of last much longer than the growth hormone is actually there the window of detection is much broader and the other two tests currently in development. >> did trials include a wide range of individuals with a wide range of body types? >> yes, it did. >> as the test gone through the peer review process and what were the results of that process? >> as i mentioned the test has had four publications related to the test itself published in the peer review literature. the bio markers test has had 33 publications weighing the background for the tests and again those are in. the literature. quite a bit of research has been done over the last 15 years. >> thank you. mr. chairman, just yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this
that i own it is the most powerful i have used and i loved it. the opening is large so it will not water all over the place i do not know why they make a small for that. this is the perfect weight you just push this two fingers and let it do the job for you. $49.95 is normally $100 on hsn that 50% off. you look perfect for the holiday season. today is the day to buy it before3 sells out. 1800 watt if they do not make them more powerful than that. the lovely darlene cahill will be here with that. let us see tamara hooks cleaned the kitchen and bathroom with her bissell steam shot. you will be able to eat off the floor when she is done. you are getting 2 steamers, you can on and give one way for a gift. we are so smart. tamara hooks will take you through the door of this. this will clean indoor toilet bowl. this whole thing works together as a super bright flashlight each one breaks 43 flashlights.it is an amazing three in one. all that and so much more duringur no. 3 of hsn today [♪ music ♪] >>host: as guy yovan and said we will take a very quick look aty's special and has already be
changes may mean two different groups. joining us here on our washington d.c. site is gregory nojeim at the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e-mails and cell phones? >> guest: the short answer is that is confused and the longer answer is for e-mail that is less than 180 days old law enforcement need to warrant -- for e-mail more than 180 years old, it is just a subpoena, so there's no judicial intervention, no high standard of proof. for documents you store in the clouds, if you store something with google docs and come back and edit it, that is available with a subpoena. cell phones, there is no statutory provision about location information. so the courts have been in different places. some say if it is real-time location, for that they need a warrant. others say this gps location for that they need a warrant. there is not a clear rule yet for cell phone. >> host: what are the changes the judicial committee has approved? >> guest: they focus on content of communications. they said it should matter how will the content
the task here in washington is going to be very difficult to convince her u.s. government to change the way it has done business for 30 years because a lot of the strategic and current imperatives drive our security. how do you actually play the right role of engaging your? it's not naÏvely giving money to liberal groups and things like this are not having a strategy. i do believe that this is a significant test inside of egypt. it's an encouraging sign, and i think, this is my prediction and were rob and others may disagree, is that it's going to force islamist political parties at least elements of the to change their ideology, if the system remains open and that's the big if, if there's a big debate i don't see it going backwards in terms of the diversity we see in egypt as large as it is it's hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> okay, we are going to move to our closing remarks and we're going to go in reverse order, so bret, you can have two minutes to make a final plea. >> yeah, in 1979 jean kirkpatrick wrote an influential article, dictatorships and double standards, in w
much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute's senior fellow and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy." in it she subjects the assumptionings and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now-bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a123 battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford-trained economists who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of
very glamorous i not? argument 8 hangers and use the bag to give someone whether it be a stuffed animal or anything else.3 >>host: gloria thinks the way i think because i the banks to. that is what i am saying i will buy the hangers heat and for me and in the bag zen-like beautiful for gift giving put something else in here. pajamas or slippers are anything.collar absolutely! i have to have the bag if i give someone a gift that will tell them what back. [laughter] >>guest: there you go. >>host: these and the bags to keep 3 gifting with. you can use these. collar it is gorgeous! that is a great thing to do your round. >>caller: have a different bag for every season. >>guest: that is a great bandeau! ok i did not think of that. >>caller: they are gorgeous! >>guest: this should not be the only day you can get this. >>caller: i have your sunglasses for different pairs, i just look like everyone says so look at her! >>guest: i am so excited. well i am going to tell you you picked the right moment because within this next few minutes that is it is over! >>host: we all that bag
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
, but accurate thomas of abuse in the second panel will tell us the exact same thing that it's moving smoothly and we have no strong need for concerns. but which case he can make her happily. if not, the old adage of the host, paul hervey and now we hear the rest of the story. so with that, we'll start right off as we normally do from the left. from berkeley is a recognized and welcomed me to the panel and you are recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. good afternoon, chairman garrett and members the committee. my name is keith bailey. i am from barclays in that division. i appreciate the opportunity to testify on behalf of the institute of international bankers of the dodd-frank at in its impact on the market. the iab greatly appreciates the hard work done by regulators and congressional committees. we face the cftc in getting this right to operate on such a global basis. a test on a focus on continuing certainty of the type of seven regulations the effect it's having on the risk of the market of the implementation process is not on a more stable footing. they recognize the need for inter
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant atten
, but thank you so much james capretta for joining us. >> since 1901, the joint congressional committee congressional committee on a macro ceremonies has been responsible for the planning execution of the inauguration of the president of the u.s. capitol. >> we are glad you are all here, this is the platform were the inauguration will take place. it is on schedule, it is on budget. our job, senator alexander and myself were in charge of this part of the inauguration. it is the presidential inaugural committee. it is also known as pic. let me review some numbers and specifics. the first inaugural on the west front was ronald reagan's ceremony in 1981. the person in charge of building the platform is steve ayers, the architect of the capital. the platform will be about 10,000 square feet. the same size as the platform in 2005, which was the largest platform ever built. as you know, on this there will be 1600 people were comes to this platform. it has to be very strong. the former president, joins you, governors, and the diplomatic corps. one of which comes from brooklyn, one comes from ne
delaney will tell us more about it. we are also about chalk card chocolate bar and get card holders year-old received six of these big great last- gifts and parolee $24.95. you putting cash or pop in gift card you will love it as well for number 230-431 coming up for first hour of hsn today. >>host: alright one of my favorites is 0 bakeryfrom auroraerrarabakery let me introduce you to the man himself mr. ernest lumpur and happy holidays to youepore and happy holidays? bria beautiful offers and let me tell you what we are offering today for thevillages these are the different choices there 3 they come in chocolate truffle cake there is the tiramisu and you can get the cheesecake from new york. you can combination or option. you can get the chocolate trouble or tiramisu cake,ruffle art tiramisu cake, tea's or tiramisu cake for cake for the chocolate truffle and cheesecake and tiramisu >>guest: we do not overcook the cake it stays nice and moist once we take them out of the% oven we3 cheesecake stay in refrigerator and we molded it takes 24 hours to make agreed tuesday. this is unbeliev
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
is the negotiators are probably going to use a baseline that is different from the congressional budget office and senator warner talks about getting savings from the tax rates going up on what the americans. as i understand, it is already built into the cbo baseline. so, in terms of getting to that four to 6 trillion-dollar how much are we talking a lot in terms of real savings and in terms of tax increases, and how much are we talking about in terms of coming you know, just a redefined baseline? and then in the other question is can you give us an idea in terms of framework we are likely to see at the end of the year are we just going to see a bunch of top line number $800 billion with some sort of trigger or are we going to see the details, and if we see a bunch of top line numbers, how long does it take to get to feeling that an and drafting the legislation to get it through the congress? >> i would like to answer the second question. >> there is an old adage that says you don't learn a lot on the second kick in the shin from a mule. we've down this road of process. we have 12 fighting hig
, the composition of which should obsess us? what is the reason behind this come pullsivity? it is the continuing proclamation that self-government is unnecessary, that one need not apply courage in making decisions, that one need not only spout the party line, but must do it continually. a group of celebrities pledged to obama, and when in the world did we begin in this country pledging allegiance to human beings? [applause] i brought this along because joe kiernan and his daughter wrote this great book. your teacher said what? this is what my child, my 13-year-old brought home from public school. are you a democrat or republican? on gun control, a democrat wants to reticket the number and amount of gun ins, a republican wants to allow citizens to buy guns without restriction. on the environment, a democrat wants to restrict drill, and a republican wants to not pass pollution laws that would cost factories money. if that's not taxation without representation, i don't know what is. [applause] the exhortation of the left are unreasonable and inconsistent insures that no one will adopt them acciden
] at the three of us got up and left. [laughter] [applause] and i've never seen the whole movie. [laughter] i wrote screenplays in the '70s, thinking i would be good at it, but wore myself out rewriting scripts for producers who nearly always believed that plot needed more back story. in the winter of 72, swanee called me and asked if i'd read the book by george higgins. i told him i hadn't, hadn't heard of it, and swanee said this is your kind of book. this is your kind of stuff, kiddo your run out and get it before you write another word. i got the book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie brown, at 26, with no expression on his face, said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home in one sitting, it was like 180 pages, and felt like i had been set free. he moved to story almost entirely with dialogue. the conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style of his writing. i stopped trying to care what was going on in my books, and begin to show, begin to show what from the points of view and the voices of the characters. bad guys and good on
, but of course it has been put to other uses, too. it's been made in an ironic and a term of endearment so the word nigger as a complicated word and has biomass space, but other aspects as well. .. zenas dress, she was a domestic commercial as a strong-willed lady who raised a slew of kids and sent most of them through college. i knew her for a good portion of my life.dieren she used a whole lot ofhe refert different words. she referred to black people sometimes as colored people, bue she also sometimes used the infamous n-word, and she's been a person whose example and whose wisdom has been all my life to the estimate is it illegal to use the n word? speing, >> well, generally speaking, nou although -- i take that back. if you use the inward in an employment setting for instancer if you are somebody's supervisor and refer to a worker who as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would
offer them the advertisement and ian fleming used to work the mine newspaper what is wrong with it? >> but the state's actually banned advertising. but it offended many writers. but what that has turned into you will find a corporate partners. i worked with to watch because if you take any opportunity then media works with partners with the of liquor they are looking for the market so you will find that type the support so that is really surprised. >> but that is not your. random house will advertise in your books author stage often by the same author. >> but the health care@ often by the same author. >> but the health care system and of their are any other ideas advertising, and museums, . >> the small business in administration would be a delightful federal partner for those who are struggling to stay alive. >> i am feeling that the department of justice case with price fixing over the e-books prices especially from where i set but intellectual property against intellectual property and we're on the wrong purpose where the tax sector uses intellectual property that does not compe
use force it is because we're the united states of america we stand taller and see further. serial huntington said something very profound the west won the world not for security of values or religion but superiority of application of organized violence. westerners forget that the non westerners do not. but to have this policy to iraq have a million children have died and then after 9/11 fed is continue. and greasy the lions running from 8098 from 18980 iraq and afghanistan to the current administration. >> with your book the untold history of the united states. >> but what we are said is not told to the university audience but it is told in the public schools are those who get history from television so that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but
. are you using somebody else's tablet? or you just always wanted one? >>caller: i have a kobo, and the candle application on my computer. actually --kindle i am trying to convince my grandson he needs one of these and not ipod. thisit cost another hundred dollars and does not do half of this. this is much more substantial. >>guest: certainly a more robust device as well. i do not know how old your grandson is, the material this is made out of its 30 times stiffer than plastic and 20 times harder than plastic making it incredibly durable. >>caller: he is 14.we have college kids that work with us and they say their friends have dropped their ipod time and time again just taking thed. >>host: exactly. cynthia i know you will love it. he is going to wish he told you otherwise. >>caller: his birthday is at the end of january so i am hoping to convince them. >>host: i agree. regardless he would have a ton of fun with it. thank you for stopping by.did you love the flexpay? >>caller: that is the ticket. the flexpay, free shipping accessories. i have never been disappointed in
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
to discuss the life and work of an exceptional american, dr. sandy greenberg, who is here with us today in the senate gallery along with his wife sue and his sister brenda even as we speak. sandy in my view, is an honorary delawarean because he spends a month out of every year at one of our most beautiful delaware beaches, rehoboth beach. but he's much more than that, a successful businessman and if i than throw pivot -- philanthropist, he has a wide array of business interests. he's a pioneer in the use of technology and medicine and helped bring telemedicine to rural health care facilities as chairman of the rural health care corporation. he was appointed by president clinton to the board of the national science foundation. and as a young man, he took a break from his studies at columbia where he roomed with art garfunkel to work in the nixon white house. all of this makes a substantive, meaningful contribution to our country. but there is one thing i have not yet mentioned. at the young age of 19, sandy went blind. he lost his sight, and with that all likely hope of a successful comp
>> at the country, our best years are still ahead of us. mr. president for my will and my remarks today where our country began a long time ago. with the dream and a pair that god will continue to bless the united states of america. >> tomorrow night, watch the farewell speech by republican senator dick lugar and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the
to cut u.s. ambassador christina and three other americans. the report cited systemic failures, leadership and management efficiencies and inadequate security at the conflict facility. three state department officials including eric boswell, assistant secretary of state in diplomatic security have resigned in the wake of the report. next, senators on the foreign relations committee who received the report speak to reporters. how not [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] >> my understanding is that the standard with which the accountability board looks at people is a very high standard called breach of duty. but there's no question that there were people within the state department that were missed and did not execute in an appropriate way. there is also some cultural issues and i mean, there were no doubt a number of problems. i would just say to that end, i know that secretary clinton was unable to be able to testify in an open setting. i do think it's imperative for all concerned that she testify prior to any changing of the machine. i think that is
. .. >> his judgment and the aarp's judgment is there's simply not enough time to use military force to respond and make a difference in that situation, but you raise a very good, broader question, and it's certainly something we'll work through with the colleagues and pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> mr. chairman, given, again, the potential for unrest across the middle east, i would hope that we follow-up on this specific question because it seems to me to be critical as we look at the situation going forward, and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to the senator lugar. it's truly been an honor to serve with you, and you leave a tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator, thank you. let me say i just thought a lot about what you said with respect to the availability of teams or forces with respect to emergency extraction, and/or emergency response in various parts of the world, and i think it's something we really need to pay attention to and think about in terms of deployment and preparedness so
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